Tag Archives: United Nations

Telling Refugees’ Stories: The Voices Hidden Behind the Panic

How do refugees and other forced migrants impact their host communities? Do they take local jobs? Are they reliant on aid? How do r efugees around the world maintain livelihoods in the face of insecurity, instability and precarity? The Refugee Economics project is a multi-site reporting project headed by Montreal-based journalist Flavie Halais that seeks to answer […]

‘If we want people to come the legal way, we have to clean up our act’: Part II of The Migrationist’s one-on-one with the UN’s independent expert on the human rights of migrants

Earlier this week we posted Part I of our interview with François Crépeau, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants. Crépeau is also the Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Professor in Public International Law at the Faculty of Law of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where his research focus includes migration control mechanisms […]

What We Need to Learn from the Tragedy in the Mediterranean: The Migrationist talks one-on-one with the UN’s independent expert on the human rights of migrants

In his day job, François Crépeau is a teacher and researcher. As the Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Professor in Public International Law at the Faculty of Law of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he researches and writes about migration control mechanisms, the rights of foreigners, the conceptualization of security as it applies to migrants, and […]

Migration, the Millennium Development Goals, and Post-2015 Development

As the world approaches its 2015 deadline to achieve the United Nations (UN) Millennium Development Goals, a variety of voices are beginning to assess and comment upon what progress has been made on reaching each goal, and how much further we have to go. The UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are a set of targets […]

Trading Migrant Rights for Opportunity

The United Nations Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families was signed by only 36 countries, all of which are primarily immigrant-sending countries.  Migrant rights, it would appear, is not a high priority for most immigrant-receiving countries, which instead struggle to implement immigration policies that address […]

Changes to Citizenship in the Dominican Republic: the Denationalization of a Generation– or Two or Three or Four

by Seth Garfinkel A child of Haitian immigrants, Juliana Deguis was born in the Dominican Republic in 1984. At the time, the question of her citizenship was not a question at all: as established in the 1929 Dominican Constitution, anyone born in the Dominican Republic would be considered a Dominican citizen. However, in 2008, when Juliana […]

Looking beyond the law: the insanity of refugee status determination

Is promoting the Refugee Convention a massive waste of time? As long as international refugee law is transposed at the national level to the personal and unreviewable judgements of adjudicators within quasi or non-judicial settings, such advocacy barely scratches the surface. So it follows that scrutinising the asylum adjudication process must be an urgent matter. But how to […]

International Migrants Day: a cause for celebration?

International AIDS Day, International Women’s Day, and International Labour Day – you might have heard of these but many of you have probably never heard of the 18th of December as International Migrants Day[1] (IMD). One of countless official UN holidays. IMD is also one of the youngest UN days as it has only been […]