Tag Archives: United Kingdom

Make 2017 the year that #LoveTrumpsHate

If you’re reading this blog, chances are we agree on one thing: 2016 was a pretty shit year. As a pro-immigration Brit, I assumed Brexit would be the low point. But by November, the US elections made the dishonest (on both sides) Brexit campaign seem like rational debate. And if you weren’t a fan of […]

‘We want our country back’

It’s been a tumultuous year on both sides of the Atlantic and as 2016 draws to a close it appears that ‘we’ in the UK and US are on course to ‘get our countries back’. But are we really? And if so, what country is it that we’re getting back? Or, perhaps a better question […]

Alone in the Sand: Syrian Refugee Children Abandoned by European Governments

In 1938, a young British stockbroker named Nicholas Winton travelled to Prague. On the eve of the Second World War, he evacuated 669 mostly Jewish children from occupied Czechoslovakia to Britain. In the UK he is celebrated as a hero. Just over a year ago, Sir Nicholas Winton died peacefully aged 106. Thanks to him […]

Insights from Calais: The Hungry Road

People around the world were propelled into action at the sight of little Alan Kurdi’s body lying alone on the sand. The tragedy of displacement is often communicated by images of bodies on beaches and packed sinking boats. But if Alan Kurdi had been alive to tell his story, if he had arrived on that […]

“Let them slash their wrists”: Abuse and Detention in the UK Asylum System

By Alex Johnson “They are all slashing their wrists apparently. Let them slash their wrists.” These are the words of a guard at Yarl’s Wood asylum detention centre captured by an undercover film broadcast in March. Staff at the facility were recorded referring to detainees as “animals” and “bitches” while encouraging violence and racism. Following […]

Whose ‘home’ is here? Equal access to education in the UK

Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit. Article 26, Universal Declaration of Human Rights Despite declarations […]

‘If we want people to come the legal way, we have to clean up our act’: Part II of The Migrationist’s one-on-one with the UN’s independent expert on the human rights of migrants

Earlier this week we posted Part I of our interview with François Crépeau, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants. Crépeau is also the Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Professor in Public International Law at the Faculty of Law of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where his research focus includes migration control mechanisms […]

Considering Englishness on St George’s Day

In 2011, the UK Census included a question about national identity for the first time. That is, the extent to which people self-identify in relation to a nation. The results showed the growing salience of Britain’s identities: Scottish, Welsh and English. Yet these identities are experienced differently by Britain’s different migrant and ethnic communities. As […]

Are the elderly more prejudiced?

Type the question ‘Are older people more prejudiced?’ into google and the first article to pop up clearly states that “Older People Are More Prejudiced — And They Can’t Help It”. The second, that “there are a lot of clichés thrown around about the elderly, but one that seems to be true — or at […]

What or who is a migrant? Considering the Migrant Sensibility

Would someone who moved to the UK aged three still be ‘a migrant’ ten, twenty, fifty, eighty years after that initial migration? Is a British citizen, born overseas to British parents, ‘a migrant’ if he or she decides to return to live in the UK later in life? In a Migration Observatory Briefing, The Migrationist […]