Tag Archives: Mexico

Increase in Deportations from Mexico Requires Closer Scrutiny

Apprehensions of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) and families at the U.S. Southern border are down from last spring, and this is due in part to an increase in border security at Mexico’s southern border. This increase in Mexican immigration enforcement is partially funded and encouraged by the United States, and it is not clear that […]

“Undocumented” is not as old as you think it is

Aviva Chomsky’s most recent book, Undocumented: How Immigration Became Illegal (Beacon Press, 2014), brings up a common narrative most American children learn early on in school: “We are a country of immigrants.” Throughout the book, Chomsky questions the historically situated ways in which we have defined who is an immigrant and who is not, largely […]

U.S. Board of Immigration Appeals Recognizes Domestic Violence as a Basis for Asylum in Landmark Decision

Last month, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) issued a landmark precedent decision in a Guatemalan woman’s asylum case.  In Matter of A-R-C-G- et al., the BIA held for the first time that survivors of domestic violence may qualify for asylum in the United States based on the harm they have suffered.  While the decision […]

Dividing the Sky: the Fortification of the U.S.-Mexico Border

“No other border in the world exhibits the inequality of power, economics, and the human condition as does this one.” (Alvarez) The “Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013” is slowly making its way through the American Congressional system, and it has been brilliantly summarized here by The Migrationist’s Amy Grenier. While […]