Tag Archives: immigration

By Benjamin T. Jones The Conversation is running a series of explainers on key moments in Australian political history, looking at what happened, its impact then, and its relevance to politics today. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has repeatedly claimed that Australia is the world’s most successful multicultural nation. While the sentiment has bipartisan support today, […]

Favorite Immigration Reads of 2016

As in 2014 and 2015, these books on our annual list weren’t necessarily published in 2016.  Rather, this is an opportunity for contributors and guest contributors to share their favorite migration related reads of the year with our readers. – The Editors. Stacy Jones – Two years ago, actress Diane Guerrero made headlines when she […]

Helping Immigrants in America

Are you looking for a way to support immigrants in the United States? Here are some organizations doing good work to advocate for and represent immigrants around the country. To add suggestions (or corrections) to this list, please contact us and include the link, a brief description, and the location(s). ACLU National, ACLU Regional Center for Border […]

In the wake of the Department of Justice’s memo about ending use of private prisons, the other announcement you probably missed

In August, a Justice Department memo provided instructions for officials to begin ending contracts with private prisons, with an explicit goal of “reducing — and ultimately ending — our use of privately operated prisons.” The memo reflected the department’s findings that private prisons are both less safe and less effective than prisons run by the […]

Immigration in the U.S. Courts: An Update

The past few months have seen a flurry of activity in U.S. courts on a variety of immigration-related cases, some more positive for immigrants than others. United States v. Texas As I’ve previously written, the most high-profile immigration litigation in the U.S. over the last year has been the lawsuit over President Obama’s executive actions. […]

How They Stack Up – Part III: The Libertarian and Green Parties and their Nominees

In the run up to the 2016 presidential election in the United States, there are drastic differences in the tone and approach toward immigration by the major political parties and their nominees. But what exactly are some of their proposals for changes to U.S. immigration policy? This is the final post in a three-part series […]

How They Stack Up – Part II: The Democratic Party and Hillary Clinton

In the run up to the 2016 presidential election in the United States, there are drastic differences in the tone and approach toward immigration by the major political parties and their nominees. But what exactly are some of their proposals for changes to U.S. immigration policy? This post is the second in a three-part series […]

How they stack up – Part I: Comparing the immigration policies of nominees for U.S. President and their Parties

In the run up to the 2016 presidential election in the United States, there are drastic differences in the tone and approach toward immigration by the major political parties and their nominees. But what exactly are some of their proposals for changes to U.S. immigration policy? This post is the first in a three-part series […]

Children of Men: The European refugee crisis is a European crisis of conscience

By P.J. Marcelino, with Maria João Ferreira and Natalia Lippmann Mazzaglia (This blog post is based on the authors’ chapter titled ‘Liminality and Migrant Decision-Making in the Aftermath of the Political and Refugee Crises in the Mediterranean, 2010-2013’, published in the book Understanding Migrant Decisions, Belachew Gebrewold and Tendayi Bloom, Eds. Routledge 2016. Special thanks […]

How will perceptions of migration influence Britain’s EU referendum?

According to Professor John Curtice from the University of Strathclyde, Britain’s EU referendum is likely to be decided in relation to two ‘poles’ of debate: the economy and immigration. However, if Simon Tilford of The Centre for European Reform is to be believed: If Britain votes to leave the EU it will be because of […]