Tag Archives: history

By Benjamin T. Jones The Conversation is running a series of explainers on key moments in Australian political history, looking at what happened, its impact then, and its relevance to politics today. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has repeatedly claimed that Australia is the world’s most successful multicultural nation. While the sentiment has bipartisan support today, […]

“A place in the generous heart of America”: Reflecting on New York’s immigrant history through Tyler Anbinder’s City of Dreams

I moved to New York City seven months ago, and I’ve spent the last several weeks lugging an extra heavy bag onto the subway during my commutes. Besides my laptop, the main culprit is a 735-page hardcover book – Tyler Anbinder’s City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York. When I manage […]

Shaping and Reshaping Identity on Immigrant and Refugee Receptivity

Europe is in a “polycrisis.” That was the theme of a workshop I recently attended, along with colleagues from Kennesaw State University, at the Europäische Akademie Otzenhausen, in Germany. “Polycrisis” in this case refers to the challenges faced by European Union (EU) member states, including financial problems, terrorist threats, and, in particular, the increase in […]

Review of ‘Homesickness: An American History’ by Susan J. Matt

By Sara Burnett In a nation that’s been around for over 200 years, a surprising number of Americans still trace their ancestry to the countries where their families immigrated from before they came to the U.S.  Among the many persistent myths of U.S. immigration, is the one of eternal optimism and relentless enthusiasm despite the […]

Immigration Stories: The more things change, the more they stay the same

I recently had a chance to read a book that I’ve been wanting to dive into for years. Immigration Stories, edited by David A. Martin and Peter H. Schuck, is part of the Stories Series, which relates the political and historical context behind some of the more important case law in a variety of different […]

Converging Migrants: Kearney’s Archway Monument and the Sandhill Cranes

It was supposed to be about books. Pictures can be removed from frames. Furniture can be disassembled and shipped. Nice, expensive stuff can be left with trustworthy people who appreciate nice, expensive stuff. But if you’re moving overseas, books are tricky. They’re bulky, heavy, and expensive to ship. And what if they’re damaged or get […]

June is Immigrant Heritage Month in the United States

“Everywhere immigrants have enriched and strengthened the fabric of American life.” ― John F. Kennedy Although the United States’ has a long history as an immigrant country, this June marks the first annual Immigrant Heritage Month. Welcome.us, a “non-profit dedicated to celebrating a United States that is fueled by an immigrant tradition,” is leading the […]

Fitting In: Bendigo’s Golden Dragon Museum

Sometimes the travel gods are against you. Worse, sometimes you hit a bad streak, where your whole decision-making process is off, and one bad decision leads to another. I felt that way on a visit last summer to Bendigo, in the heart of Australia’s nineteenth-century goldmining region. On my first evening I had dinner with […]

Displacing memories at Liverpool Street Station

It’s a rare thing: Liverpool Street Station is actually shimmering in London’s sunshine. Commuters trample and are trampled in return. This is one of the UK’s busiest railway stations. It’s clean, bright and corporate ─ just as it should be as the gateway to London’s financial district. But it’s still unmistakably Victorian: with lofty, glass-panelled […]

You Decide: The Immigration Museum, Melbourne

Are museums our new spiritual centres? Like the cathedrals of past centuries, museums have become our architectural wonders. Tourists travel to the Louvre to venerate I.M. Pei’s pyramid as much as Leonardo’s Mona Lisa, and Bilbao has become a new pilgrimage site since Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum opened in 1997. Museums resemble places of worship […]