Tag Archives: belonging

Stuck: Time is running out for non-refugee spouses of Bhutanese refugees

by Gloriana Sojo Sita was not forced to seek asylum in the corner of Nepal. She was not persecuted in Bhutan, and she was not born in the Beldangi refugee camp. Sita went to Beldangi by choice. She married into it. And now, she’s stuck. Originally from India, Sita met a Bhutanese refugee in the northern […]

‘Who the hell do you think you are?’ … almost fiction

‘We could all live on drugs, pee in our pants, drown in mud and puke sitting in the streets, covered with self-pity, if we really insist on indulging our hardships and scars, right?’ says R. No, he does not say it. He spits it, he yells, thunders it with his glass-blue eyes lightning through the […]

‘If we want people to come the legal way, we have to clean up our act’: Part II of The Migrationist’s one-on-one with the UN’s independent expert on the human rights of migrants

Earlier this week we posted Part I of our interview with François Crépeau, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants. Crépeau is also the Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Professor in Public International Law at the Faculty of Law of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where his research focus includes migration control mechanisms […]

What We Need to Learn from the Tragedy in the Mediterranean: The Migrationist talks one-on-one with the UN’s independent expert on the human rights of migrants

In his day job, François Crépeau is a teacher and researcher. As the Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Professor in Public International Law at the Faculty of Law of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he researches and writes about migration control mechanisms, the rights of foreigners, the conceptualization of security as it applies to migrants, and […]

IDNYC: The Route to Identity and Inclusion

As the federal government of the United States continues to stall on reforming the existing immigration system, individual states are taking it upon themselves to create new programs and services that meet the needs of their population. Significant media attention has focused on states such as Maryland or California that have issued driver’s licenses to residents without […]

What or who is a migrant? Considering the Migrant Sensibility

Would someone who moved to the UK aged three still be ‘a migrant’ ten, twenty, fifty, eighty years after that initial migration? Is a British citizen, born overseas to British parents, ‘a migrant’ if he or she decides to return to live in the UK later in life? In a Migration Observatory Briefing, The Migrationist […]

Immigration: Catalyst for Political Alchemy in France

By Josh Erb In recent years, the debate around immigration in France has cultivated the rise to prominence of an intriguing political figure. Manuel Valls, who was appointed Prime Minister in March of 2014, is himself a naturalized immigrant who acquired his French citizenship at the age of 20 in 1982. Born in Barcelona, Valls […]

The repatriation of Aboriginal ancestral remains to Australia

by Rowena Dickins Morrison Last year, for the first time, Aboriginal human remains were returned to Australia from a German institution (as reported here). Nine sets of remains, including some full skeletons, were returned to South Australia by Charité University Hospital in Berlin. This was followed by the return of remains to Queensland, New South […]

When Welcoming Communities Spark Change

In the news of the unaccompanied minors flooding into the United States this year, it would be easy to focus on how the arrival of thousands of children has sparked a backlash from overwhelmed border communities. The numbers are staggering, the needs extensive – how can people cope? But there’s another way to look at […]

Life, In Waiting

By Jennifer A. It arrived in an unmarked, white envelope, next to overly zealous credit card offers and grocery store discounts. A moment two decades in the making. A bittersweet sigh of relief washed over me as I grasped the holographic, green-tinted card in my hands. Is this it? Every hour, I ran my fingers […]