Category Public Discourse

“I have a right not to be resilient”: New Orleanians of color remember Hurricane Katrina

I moved to New Orleans in the overwhelming heat and humidity of early July for one reason: K10. Branded as such on banners, billboards, and a deluge of press kits, the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina’s landfall (2015) promised to be a media circus rivaling that of the 1984 World’s Fair. For six weeks leading […]

Refugee support in Germany: a question of impact

Much like development assistance in general, humanitarian aid to refugees is under increasing scrutiny to demonstrate its own effectiveness. This is particularly true in the context of massive refugee camps in the Middle East and Eastern Africa where donor money fuels the work of large international NGOs. Organisations working to fulfil basic needs like shelter, […]

“Why does the media keep showing those same pictures?” A Greek host community’s ongoing struggle

By Erika Frydenlund The storybook setting of Molyvos, on the serene island of Lesvos, Greece, makes it easy to overlook the profound changes to the community wrought by the Syrian refugee crisis. Narrow cobblestone roads wind dramatically up the hillside, and small restaurants boast spectacular views of the Mediterranean Sea and the shores of Turkey […]

A tolerant country?

Published over fifteen years ago in 1991, Colin Holmes’ ‘A Tolerant Country?’ poses a question that is as relative today as it was then. Holmes starting point is what he sees as the internalised celebratory vision of Britain as a tolerant country and British people as inherently decent and tolerant of immigrants, refugees and minorities, […]

No endless summer of welcome: volunteerism in Germany since 2015

The so-called ‘European refugee crisis’ of 2015 – during which over 1 million people applied for asylum in Germany – was not perceived as a crisis by the hundreds of thousands of volunteers who rushed enthusiastically to assist them. The enthusiasm has dimmed since then owing to changing public perceptions of refugees and asylum seekers […]

Make 2017 the year that #LoveTrumpsHate

If you’re reading this blog, chances are we agree on one thing: 2016 was a pretty shit year. As a pro-immigration Brit, I assumed Brexit would be the low point. But by November, the US elections made the dishonest (on both sides) Brexit campaign seem like rational debate. And if you weren’t a fan of […]

‘We want our country back’

It’s been a tumultuous year on both sides of the Atlantic and as 2016 draws to a close it appears that ‘we’ in the UK and US are on course to ‘get our countries back’. But are we really? And if so, what country is it that we’re getting back? Or, perhaps a better question […]

A shout out to men of fighting age

‘They’re men of fighting age!’ scream the headlines, conjuring up images of threatening brutes. Aggressive rhetoric and hyperbole have coloured the migration debate in the UK throughout 2016, targeting young, male refugees in particular. British MP David Davies claims refugees are not ‘averse to lying about their ages’, and should undergo dental checks, sparking a […]

Helping Immigrants in America

Are you looking for a way to support immigrants in the United States? Here are some organizations doing good work to advocate for and represent immigrants around the country. To add suggestions (or corrections) to this list, please contact us and include the link, a brief description, and the location(s). ACLU National, ACLU Regional Center for Border […]

What a Trump Presidency May Look Like for Immigration

Many people across the United States and around the world are still in shock from the outcome of the U.S. Presidential election this week. The Trump Administration will no doubt have significant impacts on many people in the U.S. and internationally, particularly vulnerable and marginalized populations, and that impact will undoubtedly extend to immigrants and […]