Category Economics

“They spilled on us like we weren’t there”: Louisiana’s ‘invisible’ fishing community

A Vietnamese fisherman’s wife gestures to a forefinger with her thumb, pointing to the second knuckle to indicate how small the brown shrimp are this season; “we’re not making enough for gas—we can barely pay our deckhands, let alone ourselves.” Shrimping is a difficult business even when the shrimp are large and the yields abundant. […]

How they stack up – Part I: Comparing the immigration policies of nominees for U.S. President and their Parties

In the run up to the 2016 presidential election in the United States, there are drastic differences in the tone and approach toward immigration by the major political parties and their nominees. But what exactly are some of their proposals for changes to U.S. immigration policy? This post is the first in a three-part series […]

Is bitcoin the new way to buy a new roof for your family back home?

In the last five years, the world of financial tech start-ups seems to have zeroed in on what was previously a fairly uncompetitive market: remittance transfers from migrant workers. Azimo is a mobile and internet-based remittance service based in the UK that offers an alternative to traditional money transfers. It’s specifically geared toward migrants and […]

Kenya should follow Uganda’s refugee labour example

The current refugee population in Kenya is estimated at 600,000, yet refugees in Kenya at present do not have the legal right to work without paying exorbitant fees to access short-term work permits. According to Article 6 of the 1951 Refugee Convention, refugees must be exempt from any requirements to obtain work permits if they […]

Blown deeper into shadows: migrant housing and vulnerability in the wake of the Tianjin explosions

It’s been two months since the massive Tianjin explosions. While few clear details have emerged about the causes of the disaster, or who is to blame, reports are hinting at who may have suffered the most, and the news is not surprising: China’s migrant underclass bears brunt of Tianjin explosions Migrant workers bear the brunt […]

Child Laborers, the Other “Left-Behind” Children of Migration

The pervasiveness of child labor is linked to many country-level indicators, among them levels of economic and social development, government capacity, poverty, and public education[1]. Because of this, the impact of labor migration on rates of child labor has been a focus of researchers who are interested in how remittances might positively benefit receiving families. […]

‘If we want people to come the legal way, we have to clean up our act’: Part II of The Migrationist’s one-on-one with the UN’s independent expert on the human rights of migrants

Earlier this week we posted Part I of our interview with François Crépeau, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Migrants. Crépeau is also the Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Professor in Public International Law at the Faculty of Law of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, where his research focus includes migration control mechanisms […]

What We Need to Learn from the Tragedy in the Mediterranean: The Migrationist talks one-on-one with the UN’s independent expert on the human rights of migrants

In his day job, François Crépeau is a teacher and researcher. As the Hans & Tamar Oppenheimer Professor in Public International Law at the Faculty of Law of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, he researches and writes about migration control mechanisms, the rights of foreigners, the conceptualization of security as it applies to migrants, and […]

Migration and the European elections: a view from Copenhagen

Outside my office window a new Copenhagen University building is going up: cranes swirling, high-pitched whistles and flashes of neon safety jackets. I’ve already taken to calling the building the tower of Babel – if you look here you can see why. Numerous workers waiting outside the gates of the construction site wait to be […]

Of Human Triage: Immigrant Categories and Economic Rationales

Immigration reform is all the rage in Washington these days, but if broad consensus exists for generally overhauling the system, it unfortunately falls apart in the details. The President and the Senate may have fairly similar plans, but the early House discussions have reflected an entirely different perception of the problem. So much of the […]