Author Archives: The Migrationist

Violating the Prohibition on Refoulement: How The US and Europe Fail Treaty Obligations in the Wake of Mass Migration

By Rosemary Laughton In French, refoulement means to drive back or reject. In law, refoulement is defined as the expulsion of someone who has the right to be recognized as a refugee. It is considered an offense so grave that international bodies expressly have prohibited it through treaties. In the wake of displacement after World […]

Morning at Moria: Hope and despair at a Greek centre for processing refugees

By Smaro Pegiou Last July, I had the opportunity to visit the Moria First Reception Centre (Moria camp) for asylum seekers. They are arriving in massive numbers by boat to Mytileni, the main port of the Greek island of Lesvos. Located in the northeastern Aegean Sea, Lesvos is very close to the Turkish coast, making it […]

Amid Failed “Re-Nationalization” Efforts, Tens of Thousands of Longstanding Dominican Nationals Fear Mass Deportation

By Seth Garfinkel For many, the Dominican Republic is a luxury vacation destination with cruise ships, all-inclusive beach resorts, and a training ground for Major League Baseball. But off the pitching mounds and outside the gated hotels, conflict troubles the Caribbean island. With the implementation of an immigration policy that human rights groups see as […]

Review of ‘Homesickness: An American History’ by Susan J. Matt

By Sara Burnett In a nation that’s been around for over 200 years, a surprising number of Americans still trace their ancestry to the countries where their families immigrated from before they came to the U.S.  Among the many persistent myths of U.S. immigration, is the one of eternal optimism and relentless enthusiasm despite the […]

Are Immigrants the Key to Social Security Solvency?

by Paul Stern As the march towards the 2016 campaign season begins, the United States of America will once again face tough questions about how to address the issues facing our nation. Among these issues is the rapidly increasing threat to the Social Security program created by a shrinking workforce and subsequently growing retiree population. […]

On World Refugee Day: Portraits of Resettlement and Unsettlement from Nepal

By Gloriana Sojo with contributions from Megha Rimal and Deepan Acahrya The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) designated June 20 World Refugee Day: the day the world celebrates ‘the strength, courage, and resilience of millions of refugees’. Much of what we know and see of refugees concerns their initial displacement in the midst […]

Stuck: Time is running out for non-refugee spouses of Bhutanese refugees

by Gloriana Sojo Sita was not forced to seek asylum in the corner of Nepal. She was not persecuted in Bhutan, and she was not born in the Beldangi refugee camp. Sita went to Beldangi by choice. She married into it. And now, she’s stuck. Originally from India, Sita met a Bhutanese refugee in the northern […]

The End of Germany’s Residenzpflicht through the Municipal Example

by Kelly M. Miller Out of the 28 member states of the European Union, Germany currently accepts the greatest number of applicants for asylum. Relative to its population – the greatest in the EU – and robust economy, Germany’s contribution to the EU’s more recent attempts to better share the financial burden of refugees equally across […]

The European response to the Mediterranean refugee crisis: an update

By Mirijam Beutke 2015 has seen record numbers of refugees attempting to cross into Europe by sea. By mid-April, over 21,000 had arrived in Italy and at least 1,720 refugees had died trying to reach European shores. Within one week alone, between 12 and 19 April, more than 1,000 refugees travelling primarily from Libya, drowned […]

Immigration & the UK General Election: lots of hot air, but where’s the substance?

By Erica Consterdine I was asked recently which political party has the most comprehensive immigration policy. I was stumped. Not through ignorance so much as the lack of policy substance announced by any of the parties. Perhaps this simply reflects the age-old strategy of parties keeping their cards close to their chest, and with the […]