Author Archives: Keeya-Lee Ayre

Telling Refugees’ Stories: The Voices Hidden Behind the Panic

How do refugees and other forced migrants impact their host communities? Do they take local jobs? Are they reliant on aid? How do r efugees around the world maintain livelihoods in the face of insecurity, instability and precarity? The Refugee Economics project is a multi-site reporting project headed by Montreal-based journalist Flavie Halais that seeks to answer […]

Kenyan camps are not a long-term solution

In theory, refugee camps are temporary spaces created in response to emergencies, where displaced people live before they are either repatriated of their own will in a post-conflict setting, or are settled safely in a legal agreement made with a third country. In reality, Kenya’s two major refugee camp settlements, Dadaab and Kakuma, reflect protracted […]

Kenya should follow Uganda’s refugee labour example

The current refugee population in Kenya is estimated at 600,000, yet refugees in Kenya at present do not have the legal right to work without paying exorbitant fees to access short-term work permits. According to Article 6 of the 1951 Refugee Convention, refugees must be exempt from any requirements to obtain work permits if they […]

Values-added: Social norms and the granting of asylum

With refugee resettlement becoming recognised as a significant and pressing policy issue in the Western world, it is important to consider the complexities of the way that international refugee law is interpreted at a domestic legislative level. Some types of refugee claims may be relatively straightforward in a legal context, such as systematic religious or political […]

Do Refugee Rights Privilege the Persecuted?

The term ‘refugee’ has been used for hundreds, if not thousands, of years to generally mean ‘a person who has sought refuge’. The legal definition, set by the 1951 Refugee Convention, is far less flexible in who it does and does not apply to, and subsequently afford rights to. Article 1 of the Convention defines a […]

Terror, Faith and Australian Identity: A Young Muslim Migrant’s Voice

Islam is a controversial topic across the contemporary Western world. Questions about terror, race, violence and identity are often interconnected whenever the topic of the Islamic faith is raised. The Australian sociopolitical climate is becoming increasingly hostile towards Islam and its followers. To discuss these issues I spoke to Abdullahi Alim , 22 year-old Somali-born […]

Australian Migration Law Amendments: Deciding What it Means to be a Refugee

On December 5th the Migration and Maritime Powers Legislation Amendment (Resolving the Aslum Legacy Caseload) Bill 2014 (the Bill) passed through the senate. This has significant impacts on refugee law in Australia as the Bill increases Australia’s capacity to dodge its obligations under International Law. No references to the Refugees Convention or its Protocol Despite […]