Author Archives: Amy R. Grenier

Trading Migrant Rights for Opportunity

The United Nations Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families was signed by only 36 countries, all of which are primarily immigrant-sending countries.  Migrant rights, it would appear, is not a high priority for most immigrant-receiving countries, which instead struggle to implement immigration policies that address […]

Public Voices of the GOP & the Hispanic Vote: An Update

After Republican defeat in the race for the White House not even a year ago, Romney adviser Ron Kaufman said, “We need to make sure that we’re not perceived as intolerant…[t]he bottom line is we were perceived to be intolerant on some issues. And tone-deaf on others” (Associated Press).  I wrote extensively about the importance […]

Reform Rundown: the American Congress and Immigration

Back in May, I wrote “The Quick and Dirty of the American Immigration Bill,” which summarized  the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013 (S.744).  Since then, S.744 passed out of the Senate Judiciary Committee with about a third of the 301 proposed amendments attached to it.  These amendments made positive changes to S.744 […]

Governing Immigration Through Crime

  A frequent argument against the pathway to citizenship is the one used by Senator Cruz in his closing statements before the Senate Judiciary Committee on S.744.  He cited the rule of law, but most Americans would point to the simple fact that the illegal immigrants broke the law and should not be rewarded for […]

The Quick and Dirty of the American Immigration Bill (S.744)

The momentum of the post 2012 election season has brought us to this point: an actual bipartisan bill coming out of the American Congressional system. If that wasn’t shocking enough in the context of the past decade of filibusters and stubborn partisanship resulting in letting things like the sequester happen, this bipartisan bill is an […]

El idioma inglés, la Inmigración y la Política: The Defense of English in American Politics

In the summer of 2011, I sat in a tenement-turned-museum in New York City.  In the 1930s, an illegal Italian immigrant family lived there.  Prior to that, families of Jewish and German origin dominated the immigrant community that called the Lower East Side home.  The building, built in 1863, housed large extended families in apartments […]

Firmly in Federal Hands: Shifting Immigration Policy and Local Control

The federalist structure of the United States has long complicated immigration policy.  Since Capitol Hill has failed to contemplate, let alone pass, comprehensive immigration reform since the Clinton era, the involvement of states and localities in immigration control has risen.  While the doctrine of federal preemption regarding immigration matters was reaffirmed this past June with […]

Color Me English

I chose this book for the reflection of the author’s experiences in my own.  Caryl Phillips was born in one country, moved to the United Kingdom as an infant, grew up there, and relocated to the United States as an adult.  I was born in Canada, moved to the United States as an infant, grew […]

What Now?: Hispanics and Immigration after the Election

President Obama won his recent re-election with a whopping 71% of Hispanic votes, and exit polls show that now Hispanics make up 10% of the electorate[1].  Significantly, the Republican share of Hispanic votes has dropped to 27% – down from 40% under George W. Bush in 2004 (Pew Hispanic Center).  It has been argued by […]

The 2012 GOP Platform’s Disregard of Shifting Demographics

In the past few years, the Republican Party has prominently supported state-level restrictionist measures such as S.B. 1070.  As a Salon article quipped, the Republican “party has always been favorable to Arizona’s approach to immigration.”  The 2012 GOP platform is very much in line with efforts of restrictionist activists and incorporates much of S.B. 1070 into the […]