Author Archives: Amy R. Grenier

Trump Administration Undermines Protections for Domestic Violence Survivors

The Trump Administration undermines existing protections for immigrant domestic violence survivors through its current enforcement priorities.  In some cases, such as when Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) shows up at courthouses, this is effectively state-reinforcement of the abuse of the victim.  Because of the administration’s actions, immigrant domestic violence survivors have fewer options to escape […]

The Supreme Court Punts on the Constitutional Right to a Bond Hearing for Detained Immigrants

To many people, the thought of indefinite detention at the hands of the government without access to a bond hearing is the antithesis of liberty and other dearly held ideals. For some detained immigrants in the United States, a recent Supreme Court decision makes this access more complicated – but the media simplifies the decision […]

What’s Going on with Immigration and the U.S. Supreme Court?

Earlier this month, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to review (granted certiorari) a case that exemplifies an ongoing immigration controversy, and in doing so, rule on a debate about the balance of powers within the United States government. Led by Texas, 26 states filed a complaint in federal court to block the implementation of an executive directive […]

Jade Cages: Visiting Angel Island

I’m standing in the U.S. Immigration Station on Angel Island, one of our nation’s first immigration detention centers. Growing up on the east coast of the United States, I hadn’t even heard of Angel Island until I decided to write my undergraduate history thesis on the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. In a way, the […]

Increase in Deportations from Mexico Requires Closer Scrutiny

Apprehensions of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) and families at the U.S. Southern border are down from last spring, and this is due in part to an increase in border security at Mexico’s southern border. This increase in Mexican immigration enforcement is partially funded and encouraged by the United States, and it is not clear that […]

The Immigrant Bias: Reflecting on Serial

If you live in the United States and do not live under a rock, you have likely heard of Serial. A spin-off of the well-regarded NPR podcast This American Life, Serial has been heralded as the first podcast to truly become a pop culture sensation. In this first season, Serial examined the case of a […]

Politicizing Fear: Modern Nativism in the Time of Ebola

With the American elections a couple of weeks away, politicians are using every possible means to build an advantage, including preying on the growing fear of Ebola within the United States.  According to some conservatives, the “porous border” with Mexico is a risk for Ebola spreading within the United States, something made allegedly possible by […]

Migrationist Monthly: US Edition

Last month, I wrote about the Republican party focusing on the distrust of the Obama administration roadblocking immigration reform.  This framing continues, as the tensions between an executive branch under pressure to get things done and Congress (who apparently feels no such pressure) continues. Obama issued a statement asking the new head of the Department […]

Migrationist Monthly: US Edition

“Migrationist Monthly” is a new series on The Migrationist. Once a month, we’ll be offering you a rundown of that month’s immigration news for selected countries in 500 words or less. At the end of last month, the Republican principles on immigration reform were released to a lot of fanfare and hope that immigration reform […]

Engaging in Immigrant History: Exploring the Tenement Museum

A long way from the grand buildings of the “museum mile” that runs along the east side of Central Park in Manhattan, in an old apartment building in the Lower East Side, is one of my favorite museums anywhere in the world.   The Tenement Museum tells the story of the immigrant families that lived […]