Author Archives: Amy Clarke

Reflecting and producing society through the right to vote

In May 2016 the UK’s highest court, the Supreme Court, upheld the decisions of the High Court and Court of Appeal, confirming that UK citizens who had been living outside the country for more than 15 years would be unable to vote in the EU referendum the following month. This decision came after two British […]

‘We want our country back’

It’s been a tumultuous year on both sides of the Atlantic and as 2016 draws to a close it appears that ‘we’ in the UK and US are on course to ‘get our countries back’. But are we really? And if so, what country is it that we’re getting back? Or, perhaps a better question […]

How will perceptions of migration influence Britain’s EU referendum?

According to Professor John Curtice from the University of Strathclyde, Britain’s EU referendum is likely to be decided in relation to two ‘poles’ of debate: the economy and immigration. However, if Simon Tilford of The Centre for European Reform is to be believed: If Britain votes to leave the EU it will be because of […]

Narrating a national migration history: The UK’s Migration Museum Project

The London-based Migration Museum Project was started a few years ago by a group of professionals who were driven by the unfortunate absence of a national institution or museum documenting the “lively part” that migration to and from the UK has played, and continues to play, in national life. Although at the moment limited to […]

Whose ‘home’ is here? Equal access to education in the UK

Everyone has the right to education. Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit. Article 26, Universal Declaration of Human Rights Despite declarations […]

Considering Englishness on St George’s Day

In 2011, the UK Census included a question about national identity for the first time. That is, the extent to which people self-identify in relation to a nation. The results showed the growing salience of Britain’s identities: Scottish, Welsh and English. Yet these identities are experienced differently by Britain’s different migrant and ethnic communities. As […]

Are the elderly more prejudiced?

Type the question ‘Are older people more prejudiced?’ into google and the first article to pop up clearly states that “Older People Are More Prejudiced — And They Can’t Help It”. The second, that “there are a lot of clichés thrown around about the elderly, but one that seems to be true — or at […]

What or who is a migrant? Considering the Migrant Sensibility

Would someone who moved to the UK aged three still be ‘a migrant’ ten, twenty, fifty, eighty years after that initial migration? Is a British citizen, born overseas to British parents, ‘a migrant’ if he or she decides to return to live in the UK later in life? In a Migration Observatory Briefing, The Migrationist […]

Journeying into the Hidden World of Migrants with Filmmaker Dagmawi Yimer

I didn’t want to make a scoop; I wanted to show the emotions, the fears, the attempts at getting free from the past of those who, from one day to the next, find themselves victims only because of the colour of their skin. The film allows the migrant to shed his anonymity and the public […]

What about the individual? Arguing for a more human approach to migration reporting

This week the UK government committed £12 million to a joint intervention fund intended to support France in policing the UK border at Calais. As the closest port to the UK, Calais has been a transit point for migrants hoping to get to the UK from the Middle East, Asia and Africa for much of […]