Dadaab from the air.

One year ago in Nairobi, Wole Soyinka gave a stirring lecture in memory of his fellow poet, Kofi Awoonor of Ghana, who was killed in the 2013 Westgate attack. Awoonor was one of at least 67 people killed when al-Shabaab fighters stormed into the Westgate Mall and occupied the building for four days; another 175 […]

The pervasiveness of child labor is linked to many country-level indicators, among them levels of economic and social development, government capacity, poverty, and public education[1]. Because of this, the impact of labor migration on rates of child labor has been a focus of researchers who are interested in how remittances might positively benefit receiving families. […]

Photo by Amy Grenier

I’m standing in the U.S. Immigration Station on Angel Island, one of our nation’s first immigration detention centers. Growing up on the East Coast of the United States, I hadn’t even heard of Angel Island until I decided to write my undergraduate history thesis on the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. In a way, the […]

Graffiti at the port of Tarifa, Spain. Photo by Luca Gefäller ©.

By Alex Johnson Make no mistake, what’s happening at the Channel Tunnel entrance in Calais is not a temporary crisis. This is not a short term problem, a blip before a return to regular programming. From Lesvos to Lampedusa, from Ceuta to Calais, the flow of desperate people seeking refuge from war and hunger shows […]

Children stand inside a new camp site in Croix des Bouquets, Haiti. UN Photo/Sophia Paris.

By Seth Garfinkel For many, the Dominican Republic is a luxury vacation destination with cruise ships, all-inclusive beach resorts, and a training ground for Major League Baseball. But off the pitching mounds and outside the gated hotels, conflict troubles the Caribbean island. With the implementation of an immigration policy that human rights groups see as […]

Homesickness

By Sara Burnett In a nation that’s been around for over 200 years, a surprising number of Americans still trace their ancestry to the countries where their families immigrated from before they came to the U.S.  Among the many persistent myths of U.S. immigration, is the one of eternal optimism and relentless enthusiasm despite the […]

As a cartoon of the 19th century demonstrates, The US has a long history of controversy over exclusionist immigration policies.

I recently had a chance to read a book that I’ve been wanting to dive into for years. Immigration Stories, edited by David A. Martin and Peter H. Schuck, is part of the Stories Series, which relates the political and historical context behind some of the more important case law in a variety of different […]

by Paul Stern As the march towards the 2016 campaign season begins, the United States of America will once again face tough questions about how to address the issues facing our nation. Among these issues is the rapidly increasing threat to the Social Security program created by a shrinking workforce and subsequently growing retiree population. […]

jacoblawrence_migrationseries_panel1

What are the greatest achievements in American arts on the theme of migration? John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath comes to mind, as do Dorothea Lange’s photographs of migrant farm families. I would add Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series now on show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In sixty small panel paintings, Lawrence […]

Trampoline House offers counselling, education and community. Photo by Copenhagen Voice.

Starting from the end of May, against the backdrop of streets drowning in election posters, a series of cultural and artistic events emerge in the weather-wise frozen Copenhagen. It seems like all cultural operators and organizers are mobilizing themselves – and also the artists and their audience – by a more or less accidental common […]

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